Category Archives: What I’m Reading

Devotional Thought Inspiration Justice Spiritual Practices What I'm Reading

“I Will Gather Still Others to Those I Have Already Gathered”

Isaiah 56:3-8

The Lord says:

Don’t let the immigrant who has joined with the Lord say,
“The Lord will exclude me from the people.”
And don’t let the eunuch say,
“I’m just a dry tree.”
The Lord says:
To the eunuchs who keep my sabbaths,
choose what I desire,
and remain loyal to my covenant.
In my temple and courts, I will give them
a monument and a name better than sons and daughters.
I will give to them an enduring name
that won’t be removed.
The immigrants who have joined me,
serving me and loving my name, becoming my servants,
everyone who keeps the Sabbath without making it impure,
and those who hold fast to my covenant:
I will bring them to my holy mountain,
and bring them joy in my house of prayer.
I will accept their entirely burned offerings and sacrifices on my altar.
My house will be known as a house of prayer for all peoples,
says the Lord God,
who gathers Israel’s outcasts.
I will gather still others to those I have already gathered.

Science and Theology Theology What I'm Reading

Did the universe have a beginning???

      Even though I jokingly trashed science journals and scientists in my sermon this past Sunday, I usually spend about an hour a day watching videos and reading blogs about biology, physics, and other cool things that scientists are doing. Here’s a video by MintuePhysics, where Henry gives an beautiful and succinct description (and critique) of the Big Bang Theory. Take a look.

.

read more »

Lent Spiritual Practices What I'm Reading

Hauerwas: Cross-Shattered Christ

For this season of Lent, I’m adding Stanley HauerwasCross-Shattered Christ: Meditations on the Seven Last Words to my devotions. It’s available in digital formats, which is nice. For those of you that know Hauerwas, you don’t know this Hauerwas. For these meditations he’s swapped out his usual wit and grittiness for thoughtfulness, but he is still able to strikingly challenge our thinking about the Trinity and atonement. While Hauerwas is unapologetically a theologian, he confesses rightly that “theology is a servant discipline in the church.” In these meditations, he serves the church well. Here’s a little excerpt:

Is it any wonder we find Good Friday so shattering? On this day and with these words, “Father, forgive them; for they do not know what they are doing,” all our presumptions about God and the salvation wrought by God are rendered presumptuous. Moreover, that is how we discover that what happens on the cross really is about us, but the “what” that is about us challenges our presumptions about what kind of salvation we need. Through the cross of Christ we are drawn into the mystery of the Trinity. This is God’s work on our behalf. We are made members of a kingdom governed by a politics of forgiveness and redemption. The world is offered an alternative unimaginable by our sin-determined fantasies.

Peace to your soul!†

-Ric